Articles | Volume 17, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 5561–5581, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-5561-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 5561–5581, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-5561-2017
Research article
03 May 2017
Research article | 03 May 2017

How can mountaintop CO2 observations be used to constrain regional carbon fluxes?

John C. Lin et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Mountainous areas can potentially serve as regions where the key greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), can be absorbed from the atmosphere by vegetation, through photosynthesis. Variations in atmospheric CO2 can be used to understand the amount of biospheric fluxes in general. However, CO2 measured in mountains can be difficult to interpret due to the impact from complex atmospheric flows. We show how mountaintop CO2 data can be interpreted by carrying out a series of atmospheric simulations.
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