Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017

Research article 12 Sep 2017

Research article | 12 Sep 2017

Changes in ozone and precursors during two aged wildfire smoke events in the Colorado Front Range in summer 2015

Jakob Lindaas et al.

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Cited articles

Abeleira, A., Pollack, I. B., Sive, B., Zhou, Y., Fischer, E. V., and Farmer, D. K.: Source Characterization of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Colorado Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area during Spring and Summer 2015, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 122, 3595–3613, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JD026227, 2017.
Abeleira, A. J. and Farmer, D. K.: Summer ozone in the northern Front Range metropolitan area: weekend–weekday effects, temperature dependences, and the impact of drought, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6517–6529, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6517-2017, 2017.
Akagi, S. K., Yokelson, R. J., Wiedinmyer, C., Alvarado, M. J., Reid, J. S., Karl, T., Crounse, J. D., and Wennberg, P. O.: Emission factors for open and domestic biomass burning for use in atmospheric models, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4039–4072, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-4039-2011, 2011.
Akagi, S. K., Craven, J. S., Taylor, J. W., McMeeking, G. R., Yokelson, R. J., Burling, I. R., Urbanski, S. P., Wold, C. E., Seinfeld, J. H., Coe, H., Alvarado, M. J., and Weise, D. R.: Evolution of trace gases and particles emitted by a chaparral fire in California, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1397–1421, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-1397-2012, 2012.
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Short summary
Wildfire smoke is becoming increasingly important for air quality in the US. We used measurements taken during the summer 2015 near Denver, CO, to provide a case study of how wildfire smoke can impact air quality, specifically ozone, which is harmful to humans. Wildfire smoke during this time period was associated with about 15 % more ozone than we would expect under normal conditions. This smoke came from fires in the Pacific Northwest and likely impacted much of the central and western US.
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