Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017

Research article 12 Sep 2017

Research article | 12 Sep 2017

Changes in ozone and precursors during two aged wildfire smoke events in the Colorado Front Range in summer 2015

Jakob Lindaas et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jakob Lindaas on behalf of the Authors (30 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Jul 2017) by Steven Brown
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (12 Jul 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (02 Aug 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Aug 2017) by Steven Brown
Download
Short summary
Wildfire smoke is becoming increasingly important for air quality in the US. We used measurements taken during the summer 2015 near Denver, CO, to provide a case study of how wildfire smoke can impact air quality, specifically ozone, which is harmful to humans. Wildfire smoke during this time period was associated with about 15 % more ozone than we would expect under normal conditions. This smoke came from fires in the Pacific Northwest and likely impacted much of the central and western US.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint