Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10691–10707, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10691-2017

Research article 12 Sep 2017

Research article | 12 Sep 2017

Changes in ozone and precursors during two aged wildfire smoke events in the Colorado Front Range in summer 2015

Jakob Lindaas et al.

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Latest update: 09 Apr 2021
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Short summary
Wildfire smoke is becoming increasingly important for air quality in the US. We used measurements taken during the summer 2015 near Denver, CO, to provide a case study of how wildfire smoke can impact air quality, specifically ozone, which is harmful to humans. Wildfire smoke during this time period was associated with about 15 % more ozone than we would expect under normal conditions. This smoke came from fires in the Pacific Northwest and likely impacted much of the central and western US.
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