Articles | Volume 16, issue 19
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12513-2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12513-2016
Research article
 | 
07 Oct 2016
Research article |  | 07 Oct 2016

Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

Coty N. Jen, Jun Zhao, Peter H. McMurry, and David R. Hanson

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Cited articles

Ball, S. M., Hanson, D. R., Eisele, F. L., and McMurry, P. H.: Laboratory studies of particle nucleation: Initial results for H2SO4, H2O, and NH3 vapors, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 104, 23709–23718, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999JD900411, 1999.
Berresheim, H., Elste, T., Plass-Dülmer, C., Eisele, F. L., and Tanner, D. J.: Chemical ionization mass spectrometer for long-term measurements of atmospheric OH and H2SO4, Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 202, 91–109, https://doi.org/10.1016/s1387-3806(00)00233-5, 2000.
Bork, N., Elm, J., Olenius, T., and Vehkamäki, H.: Methane sulfonic acid-enhanced formation of molecular clusters of sulfuric acid and dimethyl amine, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 12023–12030, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-12023-2014, 2014.
Chen, M., Titcombe, M., Jiang, J., Jen, C., Kuang, C., Fischer, M. L., Eisele, F. L., Siepmann, J. I., Hanson, D. R., Zhao, J., and McMurry, P. H.: Acid–base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 109, 18713–18718, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1210285109, 2012.
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Short summary
Chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or various diamines show that these clusters are not as efficiently ionized by nitrate as they are by acetate. These clusters are atmospherically relevant, and our results suggest that traditional methods may under-measure cluster concentrations by up to a factor of 10.
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