Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13455–13466, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13455-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13455–13466, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13455-2020

Research article 12 Nov 2020

Research article | 12 Nov 2020

Sensitivity analysis of the surface ozone and fine particulate matter to meteorological parameters in China

Zhihao Shi et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Meteorological conditions play important roles in the formation of O3 and PM2.5 pollution in China. O3 is most sensitive to temperature and the sensitivity is dependent on the O3 chemistry formation or loss regime. PM2.5 is negatively sensitive to temperature, wind speed, and planetary boundary layer height and positively sensitive to humidity. The results imply that air quality in certain regions of China is sensitive to climate changes.
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