Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7297–7317, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7297-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7297–7317, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7297-2019
Research article
04 Jun 2019
Research article | 04 Jun 2019

Droplet inhomogeneity in shallow cumuli: the effects of in-cloud location and aerosol number concentration

Dillon S. Dodson and Jennifer D. Small Griswold

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Cited articles

Baker, B.: Turbulent Entrainment and Mixing in Clouds: A New Observation Approach, J. Atmos. Sci., 49, 387–404, 1992. a, b, c
Baker, B. A. and Lawson, R. P.: Analysis of Tools used to Quantify Droplet Clustering in Clouds, J. Atmos. Sci., 67, 3355–3367, https://doi.org/10.1175/2010JAS3409.1, 2010. a
Baker, M., Corbin, R., and Latham, J.: The influence of entrainment on the evolution of cloud droplet spectra: I. A model of inhomogeneous mixing, Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 106, 581–598, 1980. a
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Brenguier, J.: Observations of cloud mictrostructure at the centimeter scale, J. Appl. Meteor., 32, 783–793, 1993. a, b, c
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This work looks at how the amount of aerosols contained in cloud affects the spatial orientation of the cloud droplets. Droplet orientation is important because it can lead to changes in the amount of time it takes precipitation to form. The results show that the aerosol amount does not have any effect on the droplet orientation. It is found however that the droplets are spaced closer together (there is increased droplet clustering) at cloud edge and top, as compared to center and bottom.
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