Articles | Volume 19, issue 17
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11545-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11545-2019
Research article
 | 
12 Sep 2019
Research article |  | 12 Sep 2019

Fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning sources of global black carbon from GEOS-Chem simulation and carbon isotope measurements

Ling Qi and Shuxiao Wang

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Black carbon (BC) contributes two-thirds of the climate impact of carbon dioxide, pushing methane into third place of the human contributors to global warming. This study shows that contributions from biomass burning (producing marginal lensing effect) have a strong spatial variation, from 20 % in Europe to 60 % in Africa. Thus, the inclusion of strong lensing-related absorption enhancement to all BC particles in previous estimates may lead to overestimating their positive radiative forcing.
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