Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14133–14148, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14133-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14133–14148, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14133-2018

Research article 05 Oct 2018

Research article | 05 Oct 2018

Coupling between surface ozone and leaf area index in a chemical transport model: strength of feedback and implications for ozone air quality and vegetation health

Shan S. Zhou et al.

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Cited articles

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Surface ozone pollution harms vegetation. As plants play key roles shaping air quality, the plant damage may further worsen air pollution. We use various computer models to examine such feedback effects, and find that ozone-induced decline in leaf density can lead to much higher ozone levels in forested regions, mostly due to the reduced ability of leaves to absorb pollutants. This study highlights the importance of considering the two-way interactions between plants and air pollution.
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