Articles | Volume 23, issue 22
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-14255-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-14255-2023
Research article
 | 
16 Nov 2023
Research article |  | 16 Nov 2023

Oxidative potential in rural, suburban and city centre atmospheric environments in central Europe

Máté Vörösmarty, Gaëlle Uzu, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Pamela Dominutti, Zsófia Kertész, Enikő Papp, and Imre Salma

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Cited articles

Abrams, J. Y., Weber, R. J., Klein, M., Samat, S. E., Chang, H. H., Strickland, M. J., Verma, V., Fang, T., Bates, J. T., Mulholland, J. A., Russell, A. G., and Tolbert, P. E.: Associations between ambient fine particulate oxidative potential and cardiorespiratory emergency department visits, Environ. Health Persp., 125, 107008, https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1545, 2017. 
Aljboor, S., Angyal, A., Baranyai, D., Papp, E., Szarka, M., Szikszai, Z., Rajta, I., Vajda, I., and Kertész, Z.: Light-element sensitive in-air millibeam PIXE setup for fast measurement of atmospheric aerosol samples, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 38, 57–65, https://doi.org/10.1039/D2JA00291D, 2023. 
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Bates, J. T., Weber, R. J., Abrams, J., Verma, V., Fang, T., Klein, M., Strickland, M. J., Sarnat, S. E., Chang, H. H., Mulholland, J. A., Tolbert, P. E., and Russell, A. G.: Reactive oxygen species generation linked to sources of atmospheric particulate matter and cardiorespiratory effects, Environ. Sci. Technol., 49, 13605–13612, https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b02967, 2015. 
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Short summary
Poor air quality caused by high concentrations of particulate matter is one of the most severe public health concerns for humans worldwide. One of the most important biological mechanisms inducing adverse health effects is the oxidant–antioxidant imbalance. We showed that the oxidative stress changed substantially and in a complex manner with location and season. Biomass burning exhibited the dominant influence, while motor vehicles played an important role in the non-heating period.
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