Articles | Volume 21, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 755–771, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-755-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 755–771, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-755-2021

Research article 19 Jan 2021

Research article | 19 Jan 2021

Secondary ice production in summer clouds over the Antarctic coast: an underappreciated process in atmospheric models

Georgia Sotiropoulou et al.

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Preprint under review for ACP
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Cited articles

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Short summary
Summer clouds have a significant impact on the radiation budget of the Antarctic surface and thus on ice-shelf melting. However, these are poorly represented in climate models due to errors in their microphysical structure, including the number of ice crystals that they contain. We show that breakup from ice particle collisions can substantially magnify the ice crystal number concentration with significant implications for surface radiation. This process is currently missing in climate models.
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