Articles | Volume 19, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 955–972, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-955-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 955–972, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-955-2019

Research article 24 Jan 2019

Research article | 24 Jan 2019

Comparison of Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud observations by ground-based and space-borne lidar and relevance for chemistry–climate models

Marcel Snels et al.

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Cited articles

Achtert, P. and Tesche, M.: Assessing lidar-based classification schemes for polar stratospheric clouds based on 16 years of measurements at Esrange, Sweden, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 119, 1386–1405, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JD020355, 2014. a, b, c
Adriani, A., Deshler, T., Gobbi, G. P., Johnson, B. J., and Di Donfrancesco, G.: Polar stratospheric clouds over McMurdo, Antarctica, during the 1991 spring: Lidar and particle counter measurements, Geophys. Res. Lett., 19, 1755–1758, https://doi.org/10.1029/92GL01941, 1992. a, b
Adriani, A., Deshler, T., Di Donfrancesco, G., and Gobbi, G.: Polar stratospheric clouds and volcanic aerosol during spring 1992 over McMurdo Station, Antarctica: Lidar and particle counter comparative measurements, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 100, 25877–25897, 1995. a, b, c
Adriani, A., Massoli, P., Di Donfrancesco, G., Cairo, F., Moriconi, M., and Snels, M.: Climatology of polar stratospheric clouds based on lidar observations from 1993 to 2001 over McMurdo Station, Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 109, D24211, https://doi.org/10.1029/2004JD004800, 2004. a, b, c
Akiyoshi, H., Zhou, L. B., Yamashita, Y., Sakamoto, K., Yoshiki, M., Nagashima, T., Takahashi, M., Kurokawa, J., Takigawa, M., and Imamura, T.: A CCM simulation of the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex in the years 1980–2010 under the CCMVal scenarios, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 114, D03103, https://doi.org/10.1029/2007JD009261, 2009. a, b
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Short summary
Polar stratospheric clouds are important for stratospheric chemistry and ozone depletion. Here we statistically compare ground-based and satellite-borne lidar measurements at McMurdo (Antarctica) in order to better understand the differences between ground-based and satellite-borne observations. The satellite observations have also been compared to models used in CCMVAL-2 and CCMI studies, with the goal of testing different diagnostic methods for comparing observations with model outputs.
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