Articles | Volume 18, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15219–15229, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15219-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15219–15229, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15219-2018

Research article 23 Oct 2018

Research article | 23 Oct 2018

Source contributions and potential reductions to health effects of particulate matter in India

Hao Guo et al.

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Cited articles

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A total of 1.04 million premature mortalities and up to 2 years of life lost (YLL) per person were estimated in India in 2015 due to PM2.5. Premature mortality due to cerebrovascular disease (CEVD) was the highest (0.44 million), followed by ischaemic heart disease (IHD, 0.40 million). The residential sector was the largest contributor, followed by industry, agriculture and energy. Reducing PM2.5 concentrations would lead to a significant reduction in premature mortality and YLL.
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