Articles | Volume 18, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13617–13637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13617-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13617–13637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13617-2018

Research article 27 Sep 2018

Research article | 27 Sep 2018

DMS oxidation and sulfur aerosol formation in the marine troposphere: a focus on reactive halogen and multiphase chemistry

Qianjie Chen et al.

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Cited articles

Abram, N. J., Thomas, E. R., McConnell, J. R., Mulvaney, R., Bracegirdle, T. J., Sime, L. C., and Aristarain, A. J.: Ice core evidence for a 20th century decline of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res., 115, D23101, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010JD014644, 2010. 
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Alexander, B., Allman, D. J., Amos, H. M., Fairlie, T. D., Dachs, J., Hegg, D. A., and Sletten, R. S.: Isotopic constraints on the formation pathways of sulfate aerosol in the marine boundary layer of the subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D06304, https://doi.org/10.1029/2011JD016773, 2012. 
Ammann, M., Cox, R. A., Crowley, J. N., Jenkin, M. E., Mellouki, A., Rossi, M. J., Troe, J., and Wallington, T. J.: Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume VI – heterogeneous reactions with liquid substrates, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 8045–8228, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-8045-2013, 2013. 
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Uncertainty in the natural tropospheric sulfur cycle represents the largest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing estimates of sulfate aerosol. This study investigates the natural sulfur cycle in the marine troposphere using the GEOS-Chem model. We found that BrO is important for DMS oxidation and multiphase chemistry is important for MSA production and loss, which have implications for the yield of SO2 and MSA from DMS oxidation and the radiative effect of DMS-derived sulfate aerosol.
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