Articles | Volume 18, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13617–13637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13617-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13617–13637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13617-2018

Research article 27 Sep 2018

Research article | 27 Sep 2018

DMS oxidation and sulfur aerosol formation in the marine troposphere: a focus on reactive halogen and multiphase chemistry

Qianjie Chen et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,962 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,795 1,137 30 2,962 37 59
  • HTML: 1,795
  • PDF: 1,137
  • XML: 30
  • Total: 2,962
  • BibTeX: 37
  • EndNote: 59
Views and downloads (calculated since 02 May 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 02 May 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,935 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,890 with geography defined and 45 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Latest update: 23 Sep 2021
Download
Short summary
Uncertainty in the natural tropospheric sulfur cycle represents the largest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing estimates of sulfate aerosol. This study investigates the natural sulfur cycle in the marine troposphere using the GEOS-Chem model. We found that BrO is important for DMS oxidation and multiphase chemistry is important for MSA production and loss, which have implications for the yield of SO2 and MSA from DMS oxidation and the radiative effect of DMS-derived sulfate aerosol.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint