Articles | Volume 16, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 15371–15396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-15371-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 15371–15396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-15371-2016

Research article 12 Dec 2016

Research article | 12 Dec 2016

The major stratospheric final warming in 2016: dispersal of vortex air and termination of Arctic chemical ozone loss

Gloria L. Manney and Zachary D. Lawrence

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Cited articles

Ajtić, J., Connor, B. J., Lawrence, B. N., Bodeker, G. E., Hoppel, K. W., Rosenfield, J. E., and Heuff, D. N.: Dilution of the Antarctic ozone hole into southern midlatitudes, 1998-2000, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D17107, https://doi.org/10.1029/2003JD004500, 2004.
Akiyoshi, H. and Zhou, L. B.: Midlatitude and high-latitude N2O distributions in the Northern Hemisphere in early and late Arctic polar vortex breakup years, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D18305, https://doi.org/10.1029/2007JD008491, 2007.
Allen, D. R. and Nakamura, N.: A seasonal climatology of effective diffusivity in the stratosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 7917–7935, 2001.
Allen, D. R. and Nakamura, N.: Dynamical reconstruction of the record low column ozone over Europe on 30 November 1999, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1362, https://doi.org/10.1029/2002GL014935, 2002.
Allen, D. R. and Nakamura, N.: Tracer Equivalent Latitude: A Diagnostic tool for isentropic transport studies, J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 287–304, 2003.
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Short summary
The 2015/16 Arctic winter stratosphere was the coldest on record through late February, raising the possibility of extensive chemical ozone loss. However, a major final sudden stratospheric warming in early March curtailed ozone destruction. We used Aura MLS satellite trace gas data and MERRA-2 meteorological data to show the details of transport, mixing, and dispersal of chemically processed air during the major final warming, and how these processes limited Arctic chemical ozone loss.
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