Articles | Volume 16, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 15371–15396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-15371-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 15371–15396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-15371-2016

Research article 12 Dec 2016

Research article | 12 Dec 2016

The major stratospheric final warming in 2016: dispersal of vortex air and termination of Arctic chemical ozone loss

Gloria L. Manney and Zachary D. Lawrence

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Short summary
The 2015/16 Arctic winter stratosphere was the coldest on record through late February, raising the possibility of extensive chemical ozone loss. However, a major final sudden stratospheric warming in early March curtailed ozone destruction. We used Aura MLS satellite trace gas data and MERRA-2 meteorological data to show the details of transport, mixing, and dispersal of chemically processed air during the major final warming, and how these processes limited Arctic chemical ozone loss.
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