Articles | Volume 23, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-3083-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-3083-2023
Research article
 | 
09 Mar 2023
Research article |  | 09 Mar 2023

Impacts of estimated plume rise on PM2.5 exceedance prediction during extreme wildfire events: a comparison of three schemes (Briggs, Freitas, and Sofiev)

Yunyao Li, Daniel Tong, Siqi Ma, Saulo R. Freitas, Ravan Ahmadov, Mikhail Sofiev, Xiaoyang Zhang, Shobha Kondragunta, Ralph Kahn, Youhua Tang, Barry Baker, Patrick Campbell, Rick Saylor, Georg Grell, and Fangjun Li

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Cited articles

Ahmadov, R., Grell, G., James, E., Csiszar, I., Tsidulko, M., Pierce, B., McKeen, S., Benjamin, G., Alexander, C., Pereira, G., Freitas, S., and Goldberg, M.: Using VIIRS Fire Radiative Power data to simulate biomass burning emissions, plume rise and smoke transport in a real-time air quality modeling system, Ieee International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IEEE International Symposium on Geoscience and Remote Sensing IGARSS, New York, Ieee, 2806-8, 2017. 
Akagi, S. K., Yokelson, R. J., Burling, I. R., Meinardi, S., Simpson, I., Blake, D. R., McMeeking, G. R., Sullivan, A., Lee, T., Kreidenweis, S., Urbanski, S., Reardon, J., Griffith, D. W. T., Johnson, T. J., and Weise, D. R.: Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1141–1165, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-1141-2013, 2013. 
Amiridis, V., Giannakaki, E., Balis, D. S., Gerasopoulos, E., Pytharoulis, I., Zanis, P., Kazadzis, S., Melas, D., and Zerefos, C.: Smoke injection heights from agricultural burning in Eastern Europe as seen by CALIPSO, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 11567–11576, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-10-11567-2010, 2010. 
Archer-Nicholls, S., Lowe, D., Darbyshire, E., Morgan, W. T., Bela, M. M., Pereira, G., Trembath, J., Kaiser, J. W., Longo, K. M., Freitas, S. R., Coe, H., and McFiggans, G.: Characterising Brazilian biomass burning emissions using WRF-Chem with MOSAIC sectional aerosol, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 549–577, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-8-549-2015, 2015. 
Baek, B. H. and Seppanen, C.: CEMPD/SMOKE: SMOKE v4.7 Public Release (October 2019), Zenodo [code], https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3476744, 2019. 
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Short summary
Plume height is important in wildfire smoke dispersion and affects air quality and human health. We assess the impact of plume height on wildfire smoke dispersion and the exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. A higher plume height predicts lower pollution near the source region, but higher pollution in downwind regions, due to the faster spread of the smoke once ejected, affects pollution exceedance forecasts and the early warning of extreme air pollution events.
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