Articles | Volume 16, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13185–13212, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13185-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13185–13212, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13185-2016
Research article
27 Oct 2016
Research article | 27 Oct 2016

Designing global climate and atmospheric chemistry simulations for 1 and 10 km diameter asteroid impacts using the properties of ejecta from the K-Pg impact

Owen B. Toon et al.

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Cited articles

Ackerman, T. P. and Toon, O. B.: Absorption of visible radiation in atmosphere containing mixtures of absorbing and nonabsorbing particles, Appl. Optics, 20, 3661–3668, 1981.
Ahrens, T. J. and O'Keefe, J. D.: Impact of an asteroid or comet in the ocean and extinction of terrestrial life, Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., 13th, Part 2, J. Geophys. Res., 88, A799–A806, 1983.
Alvarez, L., Alvarez, W., Asaro, F., and Michel, H. V.: Extraterrestrial cause for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction, Science, 208, 1095–1108, 1980.
Andreae, M. O. and Merlet, P.: Emission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 15, 955–966, 2001.
Artemieva, N. and Morgan, J.: Modeling the formation of the K-Pg boundary layer, Icarus, 201, 768–780, 2009.
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About 66 million years ago, a large fraction of the planet's species, including the non-avian dinosaurs, vanished when an asteroid hit the Yucatan Peninsula, likely triggering the largest short-term climate change in geologic history. Yet there have been no modern simulations of this climate change. We outline the initial conditions needed for such global climate simulations. There is much unknown about the aftermath of the impact. We discuss uncertainties and suggest new observations.
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