Articles | Volume 16, issue 17
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-10899-2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-10899-2016
Research article
 | 
01 Sep 2016
Research article |  | 01 Sep 2016

A comprehensive estimate for loss of atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to the ocean

James H. Butler, Shari A. Yvon-Lewis, Jurgen M. Lobert, Daniel B. King, Stephen A. Montzka, John L. Bullister, Valentin Koropalov, James W. Elkins, Bradley D. Hall, Lei Hu, and Yina Liu

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Cited articles

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Short summary
This study was conducted to understand the influence of the ocean on the lifetime of atmospheric carbon tetrachloride, a strong, ozone-depleting gas. Data from 16 research cruises conducted between 1987 and 2010 show that, unlike the unreactive chlorofluorocarbons, carbon tetrachloride is undersaturated in surface waters regardless of temperature, wind, or biological regime, but with larger undersaturations with upwelling. Results suggest that the ocean consumes about 18 % of atmospheric CCl4.
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