Articles | Volume 14, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13789–13800, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13789-2014

Special issue: Quantifying the impact of Boreal fires on tropospheric oxidants...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13789–13800, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13789-2014

Research article 23 Dec 2014

Research article | 23 Dec 2014

Origin, variability and age of biomass burning plumes intercepted during BORTAS-B

D. P. Finch et al.

Related authors

Automated detection of atmospheric NO2 plumes from satellite data: a tool to help infer anthropogenic combustion emissions
Douglas Finch, Paul Palmer, and Tianran Zhang
Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-177,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-177, 2021
Revised manuscript under review for AMT
Short summary
UK surface NO2 levels dropped by 42 % during the COVID-19 lockdown: impact on surface O3
James D. Lee, Will S. Drysdale, Doug P. Finch, Shona E. Wilde, and Paul I. Palmer
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15743–15759, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15743-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15743-2020, 2020
Short summary
A measurement-based verification framework for UK greenhouse gas emissions: an overview of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project
Paul I. Palmer, Simon O'Doherty, Grant Allen, Keith Bower, Hartmut Bösch, Martyn P. Chipperfield, Sarah Connors, Sandip Dhomse, Liang Feng, Douglas P. Finch, Martin W. Gallagher, Emanuel Gloor, Siegfried Gonzi, Neil R. P. Harris, Carole Helfter, Neil Humpage, Brian Kerridge, Diane Knappett, Roderic L. Jones, Michael Le Breton, Mark F. Lunt, Alistair J. Manning, Stephan Matthiesen, Jennifer B. A. Muller, Neil Mullinger, Eiko Nemitz, Sebastian O'Shea, Robert J. Parker, Carl J. Percival, Joseph Pitt, Stuart N. Riddick, Matthew Rigby, Harjinder Sembhi, Richard Siddans, Robert L. Skelton, Paul Smith, Hannah Sonderfeld, Kieran Stanley, Ann R. Stavert, Angelina Wenger, Emily White, Christopher Wilson, and Dickon Young
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 11753–11777, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11753-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-11753-2018, 2018
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
Cloud-scale modelling of the impact of deep convection on the fate of oceanic bromoform in the troposphere: a case study over the west coast of Borneo
Paul D. Hamer, Virginie Marécal, Ryan Hossaini, Michel Pirre, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Franziska Ziska, Andreas Engel, Stephan Sala, Timo Keber, Harald Bönisch, Elliot Atlas, Kirstin Krüger, Martyn Chipperfield, Valery Catoire, Azizan A. Samah, Marcel Dorf, Phang Siew Moi, Hans Schlager, and Klaus Pfeilsticker
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16955–16984, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16955-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16955-2021, 2021
Short summary
Improving predictability of high-ozone episodes through dynamic boundary conditions, emission refresh and chemical data assimilation during the Long Island Sound Tropospheric Ozone Study (LISTOS) field campaign
Siqi Ma, Daniel Tong, Lok Lamsal, Julian Wang, Xuelei Zhang, Youhua Tang, Rick Saylor, Tianfeng Chai, Pius Lee, Patrick Campbell, Barry Baker, Shobha Kondragunta, Laura Judd, Timothy A. Berkoff, Scott J. Janz, and Ivanka Stajner
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16531–16553, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16531-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16531-2021, 2021
Short summary
Atmospheric observations consistent with reported decline in the UK's methane emissions (2013–2020)
Mark F. Lunt, Alistair J. Manning, Grant Allen, Tim Arnold, Stéphane J.-B. Bauguitte, Hartmut Boesch, Anita L. Ganesan, Aoife Grant, Carole Helfter, Eiko Nemitz, Simon J. O'Doherty, Paul I. Palmer, Joseph R. Pitt, Chris Rennick, Daniel Say, Kieran M. Stanley, Ann R. Stavert, Dickon Young, and Matt Rigby
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16257–16276, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16257-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16257-2021, 2021
Short summary
Influence of atmospheric in-cloud aqueous-phase chemistry on the global simulation of SO2 in CESM2
Wendong Ge, Junfeng Liu, Kan Yi, Jiayu Xu, Yizhou Zhang, Xiurong Hu, Jianmin Ma, Xuejun Wang, Yi Wan, Jianying Hu, Zhaobin Zhang, Xilong Wang, and Shu Tao
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16093–16120, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16093-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16093-2021, 2021
Short summary
Technical note: Quality assessment of ozone reanalysis products and gap-filling over subarctic Europe for vegetation risk mapping
Stefanie Falk, Ane V. Vollsnes, Aud B. Eriksen, Frode Stordal, and Terje Koren Berntsen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15647–15661, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15647-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15647-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Akagi, S. K., Yokelson, R. J., Wiedinmyer, C., Alvarado, M. J., Reid, J. S., Karl, T., Crounse, J. D., and Wennberg, P. O.: Emission factors for open and domestic biomass burning for use in atmospheric models, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4039–4072, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-4039-2011, 2011.
Atkinson, R. and Arey, J.: Atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds., Chem. Rev., 103, 4605–38, https://doi.org/10.1021/cr0206420, 2003.
Bey, I., Jacob, D. J., Yantosca, R. M., Logan, J. A., Field, B. D., Fiore, A. M., Li, Q., Liu, H. Y., Mickley, L. J., and Schultz, M. G.: Global modeling of tropospheric chemistry with assimilated meteorology: Model description and evaluation, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 23073, https://doi.org/10.1029/2001JD000807, 2001.
Bian, H., Colarco, P. R., Chin, M., Chen, G., Rodriguez, J. M., Liang, Q., Blake, D., Chu, D. A., da Silva, A., Darmenov, A. S., Diskin, G., Fuelberg, H. E., Huey, G., Kondo, Y., Nielsen, J. E., Pan, X., and Wisthaler, A.: Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 4707–4721, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-4707-2013, 2013.
Draxler, R. R. and Hess, G. D.: An overview of the HYSPLIT 4 modeling system of trajectories, dispersion, and deposition, Aust. Meteor. Mag., 47, 295–308, 1998.
Download
Short summary
We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify the CO sources responsible for the observed CO during the BORTAS-B campaign over Canada in 2011. We found the largest source was biomass burning from Ontario, with smaller sources from fossil fuel emissions from Asia and NE US. We develop an age-of-emission metric and show values in BORTAS-B are consistent with a slowing of photochemistry in plumes. Indirect evidence suggests this slowing is due to aerosols within the plumes.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint