Articles | Volume 21, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 8341–8356, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-8341-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 8341–8356, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-8341-2021

Research article 01 Jun 2021

Research article | 01 Jun 2021

Significant contrasts in aerosol acidity between China and the United States

Bingqing Zhang et al.

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Extended ground-level measurements are coupled with model simulations to comprehensively compare the aerosol acidity in China and the United States. Aerosols in China are significantly less acidic than those in the United States, with pH values 1–2 units higher. Higher aerosol mass concentrations and the abundance of ammonia and ammonium in China, compared to the United States, are leading causes of the pH difference between these two countries.
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