Articles | Volume 20, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8727–8736, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8727-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8727–8736, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8727-2020

Research article 23 Jul 2020

Research article | 23 Jul 2020

Why is the Indo-Gangetic Plain the region with the largest NH3 column in the globe during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons?

Tiantian Wang et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Satellite measurements have revealed that the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) has the global maximum ammonia concentrations, with a peak from June to August. Here, we studied the reasons for this phenomenon through computer simulations. Low sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions and high air temperature over the IGP weaken the swallowing of gaseous ammonia by acidic gases. Additionally, the barrier effects of the Himalayas, like a windshield, are also conducive to the accumulation of ammonia.
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