Articles | Volume 20, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 1849–1860, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-1849-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 1849–1860, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-1849-2020
Research article
17 Feb 2020
Research article | 17 Feb 2020

Water-soluble iron emitted from vehicle exhaust is linked to primary speciated organic compounds

Joseph R. Salazar et al.

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Cited articles

Baba, Y., Yatagai, T., Harada, T., and Kawase, Y.: Hydroxyl radical generation in the photo-fenton process: Effects of carboxylic acids on iron redox cycling, Chem. Eng. J., 277, 229–241, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2015.04.103, 2015. 
Baker, A. R., Jickells, T. D., Witt, M., and Linge, K. L.: Trends in the solubility of iron, aluminium, manganese and phosphorus in aerosol collected over the Atlantic Ocean, Mar. Chem., 98, 43–58, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marchem.2005.06.004, 2006. 
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Cartledge, B. T. and Majestic, B. J.: Metal concentrations and soluble iron speciation, Atmos. Pollut. Res., 6, 495–505, 2015. 
Cartledge, B. T., Marcotte, A. R., Herckes, P., Anbar, A. D., and Majestic, B. J.: The Impact of Particle Size, Relative Humidity, and Sulfur Dioxide on Iron Solubility in Simulated Atmospheric Marine Aerosols, Environ. Sci. Technol., 49, 7179–7187, https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b02452, 2015. 
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Short summary
The solubility of atmospheric iron is important in human health and environmental chemistry. To understand the origin of water-soluble iron in urban areas, tailpipe emissions were collected from 32 low-emitting vehicles, from which iron solubility averaged 30 % (0–82 %), more than 10 times the average in the Earth's crust. Water-soluble iron was independent of almost all exhaust components and of the iron phase in the particles but was correlated with specific exhaust-derived organic compounds.
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