Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4177–4192, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4177-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4177–4192, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4177-2019

Research article 03 Apr 2019

Research article | 03 Apr 2019

Estimating vehicle carbon dioxide emissions from Boulder, Colorado, using horizontal path-integrated column measurements

Eleanor M. Waxman et al.

Related authors

Intercomparison of open-path trace gas measurements with two dual-frequency-comb spectrometers
Eleanor M. Waxman, Kevin C. Cossel, Gar-Wing Truong, Fabrizio R. Giorgetta, William C. Swann, Sean Coburn, Robert J. Wright, Gregory B. Rieker, Ian Coddington, and Nathan R. Newbury
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 3295–3311, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-3295-2017,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-3295-2017, 2017
Short summary
Instrument intercomparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions
R. Thalman, M. T. Baeza-Romero, S. M. Ball, E. Borrás, M. J. S. Daniels, I. C. A. Goodall, S. B. Henry, T. Karl, F. N. Keutsch, S. Kim, J. Mak, P. S. Monks, A. Muñoz, J. Orlando, S. Peppe, A. R. Rickard, M. Ródenas, P. Sánchez, R. Seco, L. Su, G. Tyndall, M. Vázquez, T. Vera, E. Waxman, and R. Volkamer
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 1835–1862, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-8-1835-2015,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-8-1835-2015, 2015
Short summary
Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in aerosol in a 3-D model
C. Knote, A. Hodzic, J. L. Jimenez, R. Volkamer, J. J. Orlando, S. Baidar, J. Brioude, J. Fast, D. R. Gentner, A. H. Goldstein, P. L. Hayes, W. B. Knighton, H. Oetjen, A. Setyan, H. Stark, R. Thalman, G. Tyndall, R. Washenfelder, E. Waxman, and Q. Zhang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 6213–6239, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-6213-2014,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-6213-2014, 2014

Related subject area

Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Field Measurements | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
Observations of speciated isoprene nitrates in Beijing: implications for isoprene chemistry
Claire E. Reeves, Graham P. Mills, Lisa K. Whalley, W. Joe F. Acton, William J. Bloss, Leigh R. Crilley, Sue Grimmond, Dwayne E. Heard, C. Nicholas Hewitt, James R. Hopkins, Simone Kotthaus, Louisa J. Kramer, Roderic L. Jones, James D. Lee, Yanhui Liu, Bin Ouyang, Eloise Slater, Freya Squires, Xinming Wang, Robert Woodward-Massey, and Chunxiang Ye
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6315–6330, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6315-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6315-2021, 2021
Short summary
Contributions to OH reactivity from unexplored volatile organic compounds measured by PTR-ToF-MS – a case study in a suburban forest of the Seoul metropolitan area during the Korea–United States Air Quality Study (KORUS-AQ) 2016
Dianne Sanchez, Roger Seco, Dasa Gu, Alex Guenther, John Mak, Youngjae Lee, Danbi Kim, Joonyoung Ahn, Don Blake, Scott Herndon, Daun Jeong, John T. Sullivan, Thomas Mcgee, Rokjin Park, and Saewung Kim
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6331–6345, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6331-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6331-2021, 2021
Short summary
Total OH reactivity over the Amazon rainforest: variability with temperature, wind, rain, altitude, time of day, season, and an overall budget closure
Eva Y. Pfannerstill, Nina G. Reijrink, Achim Edtbauer, Akima Ringsdorf, Nora Zannoni, Alessandro Araújo, Florian Ditas, Bruna A. Holanda, Marta O. Sá, Anywhere Tsokankunku, David Walter, Stefan Wolff, Jošt V. Lavrič, Christopher Pöhlker, Matthias Sörgel, and Jonathan Williams
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6231–6256, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6231-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6231-2021, 2021
Short summary
Where there is smoke there is mercury: Assessing boreal forest fire mercury emissions using aircraft and highlighting uncertainties associated with upscaling emissions estimates
David S. McLagan, Geoff W. Stupple, Andrea Darlington, Katherine Hayden, and Alexandra Steffen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5635–5653, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5635-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5635-2021, 2021
Short summary
Formation of nighttime sulfuric acid from the ozonolysis of alkenes in Beijing
Yishuo Guo, Chao Yan, Chang Li, Wei Ma, Zemin Feng, Ying Zhou, Zhuohui Lin, Lubna Dada, Dominik Stolzenburg, Rujing Yin, Jenni Kontkanen, Kaspar R. Daellenbach, Juha Kangasluoma, Lei Yao, Biwu Chu, Yonghong Wang, Runlong Cai, Federico Bianchi, Yongchun Liu, and Markku Kulmala
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5499–5511, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5499-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5499-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Bergeron, O. and Strachan, I. B.: CO2 sources and sinks in urban and suburban areas of a northern mid-latitude city, Atmos. Environ., 45, 1564–1573, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.12.043, 2011. 
Bréon, F. M., Broquet, G., Puygrenier, V., Chevallier, F., Xueref-Remy, I., Ramonet, M., Dieudonné, E., Lopez, M., Schmidt, M., Perrussel, O., and Ciais, P.: An attempt at estimating Paris area CO2 emissions from atmospheric concentration measurements, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 1707–1724, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-1707-2015, 2015. 
Brioude, J., Angevine, W. M., Ahmadov, R., Kim, S.-W., Evan, S., McKeen, S. A., Hsie, E.-Y., Frost, G. J., Neuman, J. A., Pollack, I. B., Peischl, J., Ryerson, T. B., Holloway, J., Brown, S. S., Nowak, J. B., Roberts, J. M., Wofsy, S. C., Santoni, G. W., Oda, T., and Trainer, M.: Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 3661–3677, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-3661-2013, 2013. 
Ciais, P., Rayner, P., Chevallier, F., Bousquet, P., Logan, M., Peylin, P., and Ramonet, M.: Atmospheric inversions for estimating CO2 fluxes: methods and perspectives, Clim. Change, 103, 69–92, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-010-9909-3, 2010. 
Coburn, S., Alden, C. B., Wright, R., Cossel, K., Baumann, E., Truong, G.-W., Giorgetta, F., Sweeney, C., Newbury, N. R., Prasad, K., Coddington, I., and Rieker, G. B.: Regional trace-gas source attribution using a field-deployed dual frequency comb spectrometer, Optica, 5, 320–327, https://doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.5.000320, 2018. 
Download
Short summary
In this work we measure carbon dioxide for the city of Boulder, Colorado, using a novel laser-based instrument. We then use a model to determine the strength of the emissions from the city. Based on our measurement location, we attribute the majority of these emissions to vehicles. We compare our emissions to the city vehicle emissions inventory with good agreement.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint