Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7459–7479, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7459-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7459–7479, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7459-2017

Research article 21 Jun 2017

Research article | 21 Jun 2017

Effects of the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process on global black carbon distribution

Ling Qi et al.

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Cited articles

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Black carbon (BC) is the second only to CO2 in heating the planet, but the simulation of BC is associated with large uncertainties. BC burden is largely underestimated over land and overestimated over ocean. Our study finds that a missing process in current Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen models largely explains the discrepancy in BC simulation over land. We call for more observations of BC in mixed-phase clouds to understand this process and improve the simulation of global BC.
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