Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2119–2137, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2119-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2119–2137, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2119-2015

Research article 26 Feb 2015

Research article | 26 Feb 2015

Dependence of the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere on meteorological factors such as wind speed and stability

P. K. Peterson et al.

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Short summary
We developed methods to measure the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide, a gas that oxidizes pollutants, above sea ice based upon MAX-DOAS observations from Barrow, Alaska, and find that atmospheric stability exerts a strong control on BrO's vertical distribution. Specifically, more stable (temperature inversion) situations result in BrO being closer to the ground while more neutral (not inverted) atmospheres allow BrO to ascend further aloft and grow to larger column abundance.
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