Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2119–2137, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2119-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2119–2137, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2119-2015

Research article 26 Feb 2015

Research article | 26 Feb 2015

Dependence of the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere on meteorological factors such as wind speed and stability

P. K. Peterson et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by William R. Simpson on behalf of the Authors (30 Dec 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Jan 2015) by Steven Brown
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Jan 2015)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Jan 2015) by Steven Brown
AR by William R. Simpson on behalf of the Authors (05 Feb 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
We developed methods to measure the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide, a gas that oxidizes pollutants, above sea ice based upon MAX-DOAS observations from Barrow, Alaska, and find that atmospheric stability exerts a strong control on BrO's vertical distribution. Specifically, more stable (temperature inversion) situations result in BrO being closer to the ground while more neutral (not inverted) atmospheres allow BrO to ascend further aloft and grow to larger column abundance.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint