Articles | Volume 19, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1571–1585, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1571-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1571–1585, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1571-2019

Research article 07 Feb 2019

Research article | 07 Feb 2019

Free tropospheric aerosols at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory: more oxidized and higher sulfate content compared to boundary layer aerosols

Shan Zhou et al.

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Cited articles

Adams, P. J., Seinfeld, J. H., Koch, D., Mickley, L., and Jacob, D.: General circulation model assessment of direct radiative forcing by the sulfate-nitrate-ammonium-water inorganic aerosol system, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 106, 1097–1111, 2001. 
Ahlm, L., Shakya, K. M., Russell, L. M., Schroder, J. C., Wong, J. P. S., Sjostedt, S. J., Hayden, K. L., Liggio, J., Wentzell, J. J. B., Wiebe, H. A., Mihele, C., Leaitch, W. R., and Macdonald, A. M.: Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 3393–3407, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-3393-2013, 2013. 
Ambrose, J. L., Reidmiller, D. R., and Jaffe, D. A.: Causes of high O3 in the lower free troposphere over the Pacific Northwest as observed at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory, Atmos. Environ., 45, 5302–5315, 2011. 
Bahreini, R., Jimenez, J. L., Wang, J., Flagan, R. C., Seinfeld, J. H., Jayne, J. T., and Worsnop, D. R.: Aircraft-based aerosol size and composition measurements during ACE-Asia using an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 108, 8645, https://doi.org/10.1029/2002JD003226, 2003. 
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Short summary
Regional background aerosols in the western US were studied from a mountaintop observatory during summer. Oxygenated organics and sulfate were dominant aerosol components. However, free tropospheric aerosols were more enriched in sulfate, frequently acidic, and comprised mainly of highly oxidized low-volatility organic species. In contrast, organic aerosols in the boundary-layer-influenced air masses were less oxidized and appeared to be semivolatile.
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