Articles | Volume 19, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1571–1585, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1571-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1571–1585, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1571-2019

Research article 07 Feb 2019

Research article | 07 Feb 2019

Free tropospheric aerosols at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory: more oxidized and higher sulfate content compared to boundary layer aerosols

Shan Zhou et al.

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Latest update: 17 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Regional background aerosols in the western US were studied from a mountaintop observatory during summer. Oxygenated organics and sulfate were dominant aerosol components. However, free tropospheric aerosols were more enriched in sulfate, frequently acidic, and comprised mainly of highly oxidized low-volatility organic species. In contrast, organic aerosols in the boundary-layer-influenced air masses were less oxidized and appeared to be semivolatile.
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