Articles | Volume 15, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 12043–12063, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-12043-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 12043–12063, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-12043-2015
Research article
29 Oct 2015
Research article | 29 Oct 2015

Source apportionment of methane and nitrous oxide in California's San Joaquin Valley at CalNex 2010 via positive matrix factorization

A. Guha et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
We perform a positive matrix factorization (PMF)-based source apportionment by combining GHG measurements with coincident VOC measurements in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Using VOCs as source tracers, we identify dairies and livestock as major sources of CH4 and N2O in the region. Agriculture is a significant source of N2O enhancements too, while vehicle emissions are found to be a negligible source of N2O. The findings are relevant to the state’s GHG inventory verification process.
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