Articles | Volume 22, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2135-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2135-2022
Research article
 | 
15 Feb 2022
Research article |  | 15 Feb 2022

A climatology of open and closed mesoscale cellular convection over the Southern Ocean derived from Himawari-8 observations

Francisco Lang, Luis Ackermann, Yi Huang, Son C. H. Truong, Steven T. Siems, and Michael J. Manton

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Cited articles

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Ahn, E., Huang, Y., Chubb, T. H., Baumgardner, D., Isaac, P., de Hoog, M., Siems, S. T., and Manton, M. J.: In situ observations of wintertime low-altitude clouds over the Southern Ocean, Q. J. Roy. Meteorol. Soc., 143, 1381–1394, https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.3011, 2017. a, b, c
Atkinson, B. W. and Zhang, J. W.: Mesoscale shallow convection in the atmosphere, Rev. Geophys., 34, 403–431, https://doi.org/10.1029/96RG02623, 1996. a, b, c
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Bates, T. S., Huebert, B. J., Gras, J. L., Griffiths, F. B., and Durkee, P. A.: International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) project's first aerosol characterization experiment (ACE 1): Overview, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 103, 16297–16318, https://doi.org/10.1029/97JD03741, 1998. a
Short summary
Marine low-level clouds cover vast areas of the Southern Ocean, and they are essential to the Earth system energy balance. We use 3 years of satellite observations to group low-level clouds by their spatial structure using a pattern-recognizing program. We studied two primary cloud type patterns, i.e. open and closed clouds. Open clouds are uniformly distributed over the storm track, while closed clouds are most predominant in the southeastern Indian Ocean. Closed clouds exhibit a daily cycle.
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