Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1805–1828, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1805-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1805–1828, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1805-2017

Research article 07 Feb 2017

Research article | 07 Feb 2017

Differences in BVOC oxidation and SOA formation above and below the forest canopy

Benjamin C. Schulze et al.

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Cited articles

Arneth, A., Schurgers, G., Lathiere, J., Duhl, T., Beerling, D. J., Hewitt, C. N., Martin, M., and Guenther, A.: Global terrestrial isoprene emission models: sensitivity to variability in climate and vegetation, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 8037–8052, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-8037-2011, 2011.
Ashworth, K., Chung, S. H., Griffin, R. J., Chen, J., Forkel, R., Bryan, A. M., and Steiner, A. L.: FORest Canopy Atmosphere Transfer (FORCAsT) 1.0: a 1-D model of biosphere-atmosphere chemical exchange, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 3765–3784, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-8-3765-2015, 2015.
Ashworth, K., Chung, S. H., McKinney, K. A., Liu, Y., Munger, J. W., Martin, S. T., and Steiner, A. L.: Modelling bidirectional fluxes of methanol and acetaldehyde with the FORCAsT canopy exchange model, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 15461–15484, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-15461-2016, 2016.
Bean, J. K. and Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.: Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2175–2184, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-2175-2016, 2016.
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The atmospheric chemistry associated with mixing of anthropogenic and natural species was simulated to understand how shade provided by a forest canopy impacts reactions, product distribution, and subsequent phase distribution of the products. This is important to understand, as forested areas downwind of urban areas will be impacted by this phenomenon. It was found that fast transport from below the canopy led to increases in secondary organic aerosol from nitrate radicals above the canopy.
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