Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1805–1828, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1805-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1805–1828, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1805-2017

Research article 07 Feb 2017

Research article | 07 Feb 2017

Differences in BVOC oxidation and SOA formation above and below the forest canopy

Benjamin C. Schulze et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Robert Griffin on behalf of the Authors (18 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (22 Dec 2016) by Rob MacKenzie
AR by Robert Griffin on behalf of the Authors (06 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The atmospheric chemistry associated with mixing of anthropogenic and natural species was simulated to understand how shade provided by a forest canopy impacts reactions, product distribution, and subsequent phase distribution of the products. This is important to understand, as forested areas downwind of urban areas will be impacted by this phenomenon. It was found that fast transport from below the canopy led to increases in secondary organic aerosol from nitrate radicals above the canopy.
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