Articles | Volume 17, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10143–10162, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10143-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10143–10162, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10143-2017

Research article 30 Aug 2017

Research article | 30 Aug 2017

CCl4 distribution derived from MIPAS ESA v7 data: intercomparisons, trend, and lifetime estimation

Massimo Valeri et al.

Related authors

Phosgene in the UTLS: seasonal and latitudinal variations from MIPAS observations
Massimo Valeri, Massimo Carlotti, Jean-Marie Flaud, Piera Raspollini, Marco Ridolfi, and Bianca Maria Dinelli
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 4655–4663, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-9-4655-2016,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-9-4655-2016, 2016
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Remote Sensing | Altitude Range: Stratosphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
3-D tomographic observations of Rossby wave breaking over the Northern Atlantic during the WISE aircraft campaign in 2017
Lukas Krasauskas, Jörn Ungermann, Peter Preusse, Felix Friedl-Vallon, Andreas Zahn, Helmut Ziereis, Christian Rolf, Felix Plöger, Paul Konopka, Bärbel Vogel, and Martin Riese
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1053,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1053, 2020
Revised manuscript accepted for ACP
Short summary
Is there a direct solar proton impact on lower-stratospheric ozone?
Jia Jia, Antti Kero, Niilo Kalakoski, Monika E. Szeląg, and Pekka T. Verronen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 14969–14982, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14969-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14969-2020, 2020
Short summary
Small-scale variability of stratospheric ozone during the sudden stratospheric warming 2018/2019 observed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard
Franziska Schranz, Jonas Hagen, Gunter Stober, Klemens Hocke, Axel Murk, and Niklaus Kämpfer
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10791–10806, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10791-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10791-2020, 2020
Short summary
Seasonal stratospheric ozone trends over 2000–2018 derived from several merged data sets
Monika E. Szeląg, Viktoria F. Sofieva, Doug Degenstein, Chris Roth, Sean Davis, and Lucien Froidevaux
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7035–7047, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7035-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7035-2020, 2020
Short summary
Evidence for energetic particle precipitation and quasi-biennial oscillation modulations of the Antarctic NO2 springtime stratospheric column from OMI observations
Emily M. Gordon, Annika Seppälä, and Johanna Tamminen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 6259–6271, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-6259-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-6259-2020, 2020
Short summary

Cited articles

Allen, N. D. C., Bernath, P. F., Boone, C. D., Chipperfield, M. P., Fu, D., Manney, G. L., Oram, D. E., Toon, G. C., and Weisenstein, D. K.: Global carbon tetrachloride distributions obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 7449–7459, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-9-7449-2009, 2009.
Boone, C. D., Nassar, R., Walker, K. A., Rochon, Y., McLeod, S. D., Rinsland, C. P., and Bernath, P. F.: Retrievals for the atmospheric chemistry experiment Fourier-transform spectrometer, Appl. Opt., 44, 7218–7231, https://doi.org/10.1364/AO.44.007218, 2005.
Boone, C. D., Walker, K. A., and Bernath, P. F.: Version 3 retrievals for the atmospheric chemistry experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE, 10, 103–127, 2013.
Brown, A. T., Chipperfield, M. P., Boone, C., Wilson, C., Walker, K. A., and Bernath, P. F.: Trends in atmospheric halogen containing gases since 2004, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Ra., 112, 2552–2566, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2011.07.005, 2011.
Download
Short summary
Atmospheric emissions of CCl4 are regulated by the Montreal Protocol due to its role as a strong ozone-depleting substance. The molecule is the subject of recent increased interest as a consequence of the discrepancy between atmospheric observations and reported production and consumption. We use MIPAS/ENVISAT data (2002–2012) to estimate CCl4 trends and lifetime. At 50 hPa we find a decline of about 30–35 % per decade. In the lower stratosphere our lifetime estimate is 47 (39–61) years.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint