Articles | Volume 16, issue 15
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9905-2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9905-2016
Research article
 | 
08 Aug 2016
Research article |  | 08 Aug 2016

A comparison of sea salt emission parameterizations in northwestern Europe using a chemistry transport model setup

Daniel Neumann, Volker Matthias, Johannes Bieser, Armin Aulinger, and Markus Quante

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AERONET: AOD data, available at: http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/data_menu.html, last access: 3 August 2016.
Appel, K. W., Foley, K. M., Bash, J. O., Pinder, R. W., Dennis, R. L., Allen, D. J., and Pickering, K.: A multi-resolution assessment of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model v4.7 wet deposition estimates for 2002–2006, Geosci. Model Dev., 4, 357–371, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-4-357-2011, 2011.
Athanasopoulou, E., Tombrou, M., Pandis, S. N., and Russell, A. G.: The role of sea-salt emissions and heterogeneous chemistry in the air quality of polluted coastal areas, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 5755–5769, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-8-5755-2008, 2008.
Aulinger, A., Matthias, V., Zeretzke, M., Bieser, J., Quante, M., and Backes, A.: The impact of shipping emissions on air pollution in the greater North Sea region – Part 1: Current emissions and concentrations, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 739–758, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-739-2016, 2016.
Backes, A., Aulinger, A., Bieser, J., Matthias, V., and Quante, M.: Ammonia emissions in Europe, part I: Development of a dynamical ammonia emission inventory, Atmos. Environ., 131, 55–66, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.01.041, 2016a.
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Short summary
Atmospheric sea salt particles provide surface area for the condensation of gaseous substances and, thus, impact these substances' atmospheric residence time and chemical reactions. The number and size of sea salt particles govern the strength of these impacts. Therefore, these parameters should be reflected accurately in chemistry transport models. In this study, three different sea salt emission functions are compared in order to evaluate which one is best suited for the given model setup.
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