Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5925–5942, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5925-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5925–5942, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5925-2022
Research article
05 May 2022
Research article | 05 May 2022

Influence of convection on the upper-tropospheric O3 and NOx budget in southeastern China

Xin Zhang et al.

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Cited articles

Allen, D. J., Pickering, K. E., Duncan, B. N., and Damon, M.: Impact of Lightning NO Emissions on North American Photochemistry as Determined Using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Model, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 115, 4711, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010jd014062, 2010. a
Allen, D. J., Pickering, K. E., Bucsela, E., Krotkov, N., and Holzworth, R.: Lightning NOx Production in the Tropics as Determined Using OMI NO2 Retrievals and WWLLN Stroke Data, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 124, 13498–13518, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JD029824, 2019. a, b, c, d
Allen, D. J., Pickering, K. E., Bucsela, E., Geffen, J. V., Lapierre, J., Koshak, W., and Eskes, H.: Observations of Lightning NOx Production from TROPOMI Case Studies over the United States, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 126, e2020JD034174, https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JD034174, 2021. a, b, c, d, e
Bandholnopparat, K., Sato, M., Adachi, T., Ushio, T., and Takahashi, Y.: Estimation of the IC to CG Ratio Using JEM-GLIMS and Ground-Based Lightning Network Data, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 125, e2019JD032195, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019jd032195, 2020. a
Barth, M. C., Rutledge, S. A., Brune, W. H., and Cantrell, C. A.: Introduction to the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) 2012 Studies, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 124, 8095–8103, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019jd030944, 2019. a, b
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Short summary
The importance of convection to the ozone and nitrogen oxides (NOx) produced from lightning has long been an open question. We utilize the high-resolution chemistry model with ozonesondes and space observations to discuss the effects of convection over southeastern China, where few studies have been conducted. Our results show the transport and chemistry contributions for various storms and demonstrate the ability of TROPOMI to estimate the lightning NOx production over small-scale convection.
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