Articles | Volume 16, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11249–11265, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11249-2016

Special issue: East Asia emissions assessment (EA2)

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11249–11265, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11249-2016

Research article 12 Sep 2016

Research article | 12 Sep 2016

Source apportionment of PM2.5 at a regional background site in North China using PMF linked with radiocarbon analysis: insight into the contribution of biomass burning

Zheng Zong et al.

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Cited articles

Amil, N., Latif, M. T., Khan, M. F., and Mohamad, M.: Seasonal variability of PM2.5 composition and sources in the Klang Valley urban-industrial environment, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 5357–5381, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-5357-2016, 2016.
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Boynard, A., Clerbaux, C., Clarisse, L., Safieddine, S., Pommier, M., Van Damme, M., Bauduin, S., Oudot, C., Hadji-Lazaro, J., Hurtmans, D., and Coheur, P.-F.: First simultaneous space measurements of atmospheric pollutants in the boundary layer from IASI: A case study in the North China Plain, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 645–651, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013gl058333, 2014.
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Cao, J.-J., Chow, J. C., Tao, J., Lee, S.-C., Watson, J. G., Ho, K.-F., Wang, G.-H., Zhu, C.-S., and Han, Y.-M.: Stable carbon isotopes in aerosols from Chinese cities: Influence of fossil fuels, Atmos. Environ., 45, 1359–1363, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.10.056, 2011.
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Short summary
We explore the source apportionment of PM2.5 in North China in winter using an original combination method, and coal combustion, biomass burning and vehicle emissions are identified as the largest contributors of PM2.5, accounting for 29.6, 19.3 and 15.8 %, respectively. Biomass burning emission was highlighted in the present study because of its dominant contribution to the PM2.5 burden in the Shandong Peninsula and because it is neglected in the air pollution control program.
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