Articles | Volume 23, issue 20
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-13061-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-13061-2023
Research article
 | 
17 Oct 2023
Research article |  | 17 Oct 2023

Historical (1960–2014) lightning and LNOx trends and their controlling factors in a chemistry–climate model

Yanfeng He and Kengo Sudo

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Subject: Clouds and Precipitation | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling and Data Analysis | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
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Cited articles

Allen, D. J., Pickering, K. E., Bucsela, E., Krotkov, N., and Holzworth, R.: Lightning NOx Production in the Tropics as Determined Using OMI NO2 Retrievals and WWLLN Stroke Data, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 124, 13498–13518, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JD029824, 2019. 
Altaratz, O., Kucienska, B., Kostinski, A., Raga, G. B., and Koren, I.: Global association of aerosol with flash density of intense lightning, Environ. Res. Lett., 12, 114037, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aa922b, 2017. 
Arfeuille, F., Luo, B. P., Heckendorn, P., Weisenstein, D., Sheng, J. X., Rozanov, E., Schraner, M., Brönnimann, S., Thomason, L. W., and Peter, T.: Modeling the stratospheric warming following the Mt. Pinatubo eruption: uncertainties in aerosol extinctions, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 11221–11234, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-11221-2013, 2013. 
Banerjee, A., Archibald, A. T., Maycock, A. C., Telford, P., Abraham, N. L., Yang, X., Braesicke, P., and Pyle, J. A.: Lightning NOx, a key chemistry–climate interaction: impacts of future climate change and consequences for tropospheric oxidising capacity, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 9871–9881, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-9871-2014, 2014. 
Boccippio, D. J., Koshak, W. J., and Blakeslee, R. J.: Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part I: Predicted Diurnal Variability, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 19, 1318–1332, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0426(2002)019<1318:PAOTOT>2.0.CO;2, 2002. 
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Short summary
Lightning has big social impacts. Lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) plays a vital role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. Investigating past lightning and LNOx trends can provide essential indicators of all lightning-related phenomena. Simulations show almost flat global lightning and LNOx trends during 1960–2014. Past global warming enhances the trends positively, but increases in aerosol have the opposite effect. Moreover, global lightning decreased markedly after the Pinatubo eruption.
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