Articles | Volume 21, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6857–6873, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6857-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6857–6873, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6857-2021
Research article
05 May 2021
Research article | 05 May 2021

Stratospheric carbon isotope fractionation and tropospheric histories of CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 isotopologues

Max Thomas et al.

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Cited articles

Adcock, K. E., Reeves, C. E., Gooch, L. J., Leedham Elvidge, E. C., Ashfold, M. J., Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M., Chou, C., Fraser, P. J., Langenfelds, R. L., Mohd Hanif, N., O'Doherty, S., Oram, D. E., Ou-Yang, C.-F., Phang, S. M., Samah, A. A., Röckmann, T., Sturges, W. T., and Laube, J. C.: Continued increase of CFC-113a (CCl3CF3) mixing ratios in the global atmosphere: emissions, occurrence and potential sources, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 4737–4751, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-4737-2018, 2018. a, b, c, d
Adcock, K. E., Ashfold, M. J., Chou, C. C.-K., Gooch, L. J., Mohd Hanif, N., Laube, J. C., Oram, D. E., Ou-Yang, C.-F., Panagi, M., Sturges, W. T., and Reeves, C. E.: Investigation of East Asian emissions of CFC-11 using atmospheric observations in Taiwan, Environ. Sci. Technol., 54, 3814–3822, 2020. a
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Short summary
CFC gases are destroying the Earth's life-protecting ozone layer. We improve understanding of CFC destruction by measuring the isotopic fingerprint of the carbon in the three most abundant CFCs. These are the first such measurements in the main region where CFCs are destroyed – the stratosphere. We reconstruct the atmospheric isotope histories of these CFCs back to the 1950s by measuring air extracted from deep snow and using a model. The model and the measurements are generally consistent.
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