Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12741-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12741-2020
Research article
 | 
04 Nov 2020
Research article |  | 04 Nov 2020

Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds from warm and oligotrophic seawater in the Eastern Mediterranean

Chen Dayan, Erick Fredj, Pawel K. Misztal, Maor Gabay, Alex B. Guenther, and Eran Tas

Related authors

Instantaneous intraday changes in key meteorological parameters as a proxy for the mixing ratio of BVOCs over vegetation under drought conditions
Qian Li, Maor Gabay, Chen Dayan, Pawel Misztal, Alex Guenther, Erick Fredj, and Eran Tas
EGUsphere, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-717,https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-717, 2024
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Field Measurements | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
Surface snow bromide and nitrate at Eureka, Canada, in early spring and implications for polar boundary layer chemistry
Xin Yang, Kimberly Strong, Alison S. Criscitiello, Marta Santos-Garcia, Kristof Bognar, Xiaoyi Zhao, Pierre Fogal, Kaley A. Walker, Sara M. Morris, and Peter Effertz
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 5863–5886, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-5863-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-5863-2024, 2024
Short summary
Opinion: Strengthening research in the Global South – atmospheric science opportunities in South America and Africa
Rebecca M. Garland, Katye E. Altieri, Laura Dawidowski, Laura Gallardo, Aderiana Mbandi, Nestor Y. Rojas, and N'datchoh E. Touré
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 5757–5764, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-5757-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-5757-2024, 2024
Short summary
Shipping and algae emissions have a major impact on ambient air mixing ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and methanethiol on Utö Island in the Baltic Sea
Heidi Hellén, Rostislav Kouznetsov, Kaisa Kraft, Jukka Seppälä, Mika Vestenius, Jukka-Pekka Jalkanen, Lauri Laakso, and Hannele Hakola
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 4717–4731, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4717-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4717-2024, 2024
Short summary
Contribution of cooking emissions to the urban volatile organic compounds in Las Vegas, NV
Matthew M. Coggon, Chelsea E. Stockwell, Lu Xu, Jeff Peischl, Jessica B. Gilman, Aaron Lamplugh, Henry J. Bowman, Kenneth Aikin, Colin Harkins, Qindan Zhu, Rebecca H. Schwantes, Jian He, Meng Li, Karl Seltzer, Brian McDonald, and Carsten Warneke
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 4289–4304, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4289-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4289-2024, 2024
Short summary
Reanalysis of NOAA H2 observations: implications for the H2 budget
Fabien Paulot, Gabrielle Pétron, Andrew M. Crotwell, and Matteo B. Bertagni
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 4217–4229, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4217-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-4217-2024, 2024
Short summary

Cited articles

Alvarez, L. A., Exton, D. A., Timmis, K. N., Suggett, D. J., and McGenity, T. J.: Characterization of marine isoprene-degrading communities, Environ. Microbiol., 11, 3280–3291, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02069.x, 2009. 
Andreae, M. O.: Ocean-atmosphere interactions in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, Mar. Chem., 30, 1–29, https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-4203(90)90059-L, 1990. 
Arneth, A., Monson, R. K., Schurgers, G., Niinemets, Ü., and Palmer, P. I.: Why are estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions so similar (and why is this not so for monoterpenes)?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 4605–4620, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-8-4605-2008, 2008. 
Arnold, S. R., Spracklen, D. V., Williams, J., Yassaa, N., Sciare, J., Bonsang, B., Gros, V., Peeken, I., Lewis, A. C., Alvain, S., and Moulin, C.: Evaluation of the global oceanic isoprene source and its impacts on marine organic carbon aerosol, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 1253–1262, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-9-1253-2009, 2009. 
Ayers, G. P., Cainey, J. M., Gillett, R. W., and Ivey, J. P.: Atmospheric sulphur and cloud condensation nuclei in marine air in the Southern Hemisphere, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci., 352, 203–211, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.1997.0015, 1997. 
Download
Short summary
We studied the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds from both marine and terrestrial ecosystems in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin, a global warming hot spot. We focused on isoprene and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which are well recognized for their effect on climate and strong impact on photochemical pollution by the former. We found high emissions of isoprene and a strong decadal decrease in the emission of DMS which can both be attributed to the strong increase in seawater temperature.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint