Articles | Volume 15, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 11667–11682, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-11667-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 11667–11682, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-11667-2015

Research article 21 Oct 2015

Research article | 21 Oct 2015

PM2.5 water-soluble elements in the southeastern United States: automated analytical method development, spatiotemporal distributions, source apportionment, and implications for heath studies

T. Fang et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
This work presented a new method of quantifying water-soluble elements in PM2.5 aqueous extracts (N~500) with an X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The results indicate that water-soluble elements had marked spatial and temporal patterns. Four sources were resolved: brake/tire wear, biomass burning, secondary formation, and mineral dust. The findings have informed studies on aerosol oxidative potential and provided insights into the health effects of water-soluble metals, especially Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn.
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