Articles | Volume 14, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 11985–11996, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-11985-2014
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 11985–11996, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-11985-2014

Research article 14 Nov 2014

Research article | 14 Nov 2014

Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

S. C. Pryor et al.

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Cited articles

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What role do forests play in determining the concentration (and composition) of climate-relevant aerosol particles? This study seeks to address two aspects of this question. Firstly, we document high in-canopy removal of recently formed particles. Then we show evidence that growth rates of particles are a function of soil water availability via a reduction in canopy emissions of gases responsible for particle growth to climate-relevant sizes during drought conditions.
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