Articles | Volume 23, issue 21
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-13685-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-13685-2023
Research article
 | 
03 Nov 2023
Research article |  | 03 Nov 2023

Understanding offshore high-ozone events during TRACER-AQ 2021 in Houston: insights from WRF–CAMx photochemical modeling

Wei Li, Yuxuan Wang, Xueying Liu, Ehsan Soleimanian, Travis Griggs, James Flynn, and Paul Walter

Related authors

Observed and CMIP6 model simulated organic aerosol response to drought in the contiguous United States during summertime
Wei Li and Yuxuan Wang
EGUsphere, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-430,https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-430, 2024
Short summary
Evaluating WRF-GC v2.0 predictions of boundary layer height and vertical ozone profile during the 2021 TRACER-AQ campaign in Houston, Texas
Xueying Liu, Yuxuan Wang, Shailaja Wasti, Wei Li, Ehsan Soleimanian, James Flynn, Travis Griggs, Sergio Alvarez, John T. Sullivan, Maurice Roots, Laurence Twigg, Guillaume Gronoff, Timothy Berkoff, Paul Walter, Mark Estes, Johnathan W. Hair, Taylor Shingler, Amy Jo Scarino, Marta Fenn, and Laura Judd
Geosci. Model Dev., 16, 5493–5514, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-5493-2023,https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-5493-2023, 2023
Short summary
Satellite-derived constraints on the effect of drought stress on biogenic isoprene emissions in the southeastern US
Yuxuan Wang, Nan Lin, Wei Li, Alex Guenther, Joey C. Y. Lam, Amos P. K. Tai, Mark J. Potosnak, and Roger Seco
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 14189–14208, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-14189-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-14189-2022, 2022
Short summary
Interactive biogenic emissions and drought stress effects on atmospheric composition in NASA GISS ModelE
Elizabeth Klovenski, Yuxuan Wang, Susanne E. Bauer, Kostas Tsigaridis, Greg Faluvegi, Igor Aleinov, Nancy Y. Kiang, Alex Guenther, Xiaoyan Jiang, Wei Li, and Nan Lin
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 13303–13323, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13303-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13303-2022, 2022
Short summary
Reduced surface fine dust under droughts over the southeastern United States during summertime: observations and CMIP6 model simulations
Wei Li and Yuxuan Wang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7843–7859, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7843-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7843-2022, 2022
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling and Data Analysis | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
NOx emissions in France in 2019–2021 as estimated by the high-spatial-resolution assimilation of TROPOMI NO2 observations
Robin Plauchu, Audrey Fortems-Cheiney, Grégoire Broquet, Isabelle Pison, Antoine Berchet, Elise Potier, Gaëlle Dufour, Adriana Coman, Dilek Savas, Guillaume Siour, and Henk Eskes
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 8139–8163, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-8139-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-8139-2024, 2024
Short summary
Aggravated surface O3 pollution primarily driven by meteorological variations in China during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic lockdown period
Zhendong Lu, Jun Wang, Yi Wang, Daven K. Henze, Xi Chen, Tong Sha, and Kang Sun
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 7793–7813, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7793-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7793-2024, 2024
Short summary
Identifying decadal trends in deweathered concentrations of criteria air pollutants in Canadian urban atmospheres with machine learning approaches
Xiaohong Yao and Leiming Zhang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 7773–7791, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7773-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7773-2024, 2024
Short summary
Evaluation of modelled versus observed non-methane volatile organic compounds at European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme sites in Europe
Yao Ge, Sverre Solberg, Mathew R. Heal, Stefan Reimann, Willem van Caspel, Bryan Hellack, Thérèse Salameh, and David Simpson
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 7699–7729, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7699-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7699-2024, 2024
Short summary
Constraining non-methane VOC emissions with TROPOMI HCHO observations: impact on summertime ozone simulation in August 2022 in China
Shuzhuang Feng, Fei Jiang, Tianlu Qian, Nan Wang, Mengwei Jia, Songci Zheng, Jiansong Chen, Fang Ying, and Weimin Ju
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 7481–7498, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7481-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-7481-2024, 2024
Short summary

Cited articles

Abdi-Oskouei, M., Carmichael, G., Christiansen, M., Ferrada, G., Roozitalab, B., Sobhani, N., Wade, K., Czarnetzki, A., Pierce, R. B., Wagner, T., and Stanier, C.: Sensitivity of Meteorological Skill to Selection of WRF-Chem Physical Parameterizations and Impact on Ozone Prediction During the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS), J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 125, e2019JD031971, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JD031971, 2020. 
Abdi-Oskouei, M., Roozitalab, B., Stanier, C. O., Christiansen, M., Pfister, G., Pierce, R. B., McDonald, B. C., Adelman, Z., Janseen, M., Dickens, A. F., and Carmichael, G. R.: The Impact of Volatile Chemical Products, Other VOCs, and NOx on Peak Ozone in the Lake Michigan Region, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 127, e2022JD037042, https://doi.org/10.1029/2022JD037042, 2022. 
Baker, K. R., Liljegren, J., Valin, L., Judd, L., Szykman, J., Millet, D. B., Czarnetzki, A., Whitehill, A., Murphy, B., and Stanier, C.: Photochemical model representation of ozone and precursors during the 2017 Lake Michigan ozone study (LMOS), Atmos. Environ., 293, 119465, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2022.119465, 2023. 
Banta, R. M., Senff, C. J., Nielsen-Gammon, J., Darby, L. S., Ryerson, T. B., Alvarez, R. J., Sandberg, S. P., Williams, E. J., and Trainer, M.: A Bad Air Day in Houston, B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 86, 657–670, https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-86-5-657, 2005. 
Bernier, C., Wang, Y., Gronoff, G., Berkoff, T., Knowland, K. E., Sullivan, J. T., Delgado, R., Caicedo, V., and Carroll, B.: Cluster-based characterization of multi-dimensional tropospheric ozone variability in coastal regions: an analysis of lidar measurements and model results, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15313–15331, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15313-2022, 2022. 
Download
Short summary
This study examined high offshore ozone events in Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, using boat data and WRF–CAMx modeling during the TRACER-AQ 2021 field campaign. On average, high ozone is caused by chemistry due to the regional transport of volatile organic compounds and downwind advection of NOx from the ship channel. Two case studies show advection of ozone can be another process leading to high ozone, and accurate wind prediction is crucial for air quality forecasting in coastal areas.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint