Articles | Volume 20, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9939–9959, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9939-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9939–9959, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9939-2020

Research article 26 Aug 2020

Research article | 26 Aug 2020

Revisiting global satellite observations of stratospheric cirrus clouds

Ling Zou et al.

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Subject: Clouds and Precipitation | Research Activity: Remote Sensing | Altitude Range: Stratosphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
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Cited articles

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Bourassa, A. E., Degenstein, D. A., and Llewellyn, E. J.: Climatology of the subvisual cirrus clouds as seen by OSIRIS on Odin, in: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 36, Elsevier Ltd., 807–812, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2005.05.045, 2005. a
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Cirrus clouds appearing in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere have important impacts on the radiation budget and climate change. We revisited global stratospheric cirrus clouds with CALIPSO and for the first time with MIPAS satellite observations. Stratospheric cirrus clouds related to deep convection are frequently detected in the tropics. At middle latitudes, MIPAS detects more than twice as many stratospheric cirrus clouds due to higher detection sensitivity.
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