Articles | Volume 20, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 5093–5110, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-5093-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 5093–5110, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-5093-2020
Research article
30 Apr 2020
Research article | 30 Apr 2020

The effects of cloud–aerosol interaction complexity on simulations of presummer rainfall over southern China

Kalli Furtado et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
By combining observations with simulations from a weather forecasting model, new insights are obtained into extreme rainfall processes. We use a model which includes the effects of aerosols on clouds in a fully consistent way. This greater complexity improves realism but raises the computational cost. We address the cost–benefit relationship of this and show that cloud–aerosol interactions have important, measurable benefits for simulating climate extremes.
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