Articles | Volume 16, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7435–7449, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7435-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7435–7449, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7435-2016
Research article
15 Jun 2016
Research article | 15 Jun 2016

The role of dew as a night-time reservoir and morning source for atmospheric ammonia

Gregory R. Wentworth et al.

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Short summary
The influence of dew on atmospheric composition is poorly understood. Results from this work show that dew can uptake a significant fraction (roughly two-thirds) of boundary layer gas-phase ammonia. Furthermore, an average of 95 % of the ammonia sequestered in dew is released back to the atmosphere the following morning during dew evaporation. Dew has the ability to affect air quality and N-deposition and should be considered when modelling ammonia concentrations, as well as other soluble gases.
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