Articles | Volume 16, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 195–214, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-195-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 195–214, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-195-2016

Research article 18 Jan 2016

Research article | 18 Jan 2016

Can we explain the observed methane variability after the Mount Pinatubo eruption?

N. Bândă et al.

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Cited articles

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Bândă, N., Krol, M., van Weele, M., van Noije, T., and Röckmann, T.: Analysis of global methane changes after the 1991 Pinatubo volcanic eruption, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 2267–2281, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-2267-2013, 2013.
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Short summary
We quantify the processes responsible for methane growth rate variability in the period 1990 to 1995, a period with variations in climate and radiation due to the Pinatubo eruption. We find significant contributions from changes in the methane emission from wetlands, and in the methane removal by OH caused by stratospheric aerosols, by the decrease in temperature and water vapour, by stratospheric ozone depletion and by changes in emissions of CO and NMVOC.
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