Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12499–12514, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12499-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12499–12514, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12499-2020
Research article
31 Oct 2020
Research article | 31 Oct 2020

Influence of gravity wave temperature anomalies and their vertical gradients on cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer – a satellite-based view

Kai-Wei Chang and Tristan L'Ecuyer

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Cited articles

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Short summary
High-altitude clouds in the tropics that reside in the transition layer between the troposphere and stratosphere are important as they influence the amount of water vapor going into the stratosphere. Waves in the atmosphere can influence the temperature and form these high-altitude cirrus clouds. We use satellite observations to explore the connection between atmospheric waves and clouds and show that cirrus clouds occurrence and properties are closely correlated with waves.
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