Articles | Volume 19, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13367–13381, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13367-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13367–13381, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13367-2019

Research article 30 Oct 2019

Research article | 30 Oct 2019

The mechanisms and meteorological drivers of the summertime ozone–temperature relationship

William C. Porter and Colette L. Heald

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Cited articles

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Short summary
In this paper we explore the connection between changes in surface temperature and changes in ozone pollution. While explanations for this connection have been proposed in the past, we attempt to better quantify them using models and statistics. We find that some of the most commonly cited mechanisms, including biogenic emissions and temperature-dependent chemical processes, can explain less than half of the O3T correlation. Meteorology is identified as the most likely driver for the remainder.
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